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Changing culture that values & rewards Performance
Human Resources » Performance Management


Chrm Message From: mayurr Total Posts: 20 Join Date: 14/04/2009
Rank: Executive Post Date: 12/07/2010 09:11:43 Points: 100 Location: India
Dear all,

Though not conceptually, but we all as HR porfessionals face this issue in our organisations at some point of time. Can we contribute to do something about this?? Lets give it a thought..
 
Changing a paternalistic culture to one that values and rewards performance can be challenging, but you can do it if you put the basics in place. Focus on expectations, feedback and rewards.

Expectations
Business goals and performance objectives should be clearly established and communicated so that employees know what is expected and how they are to perform.

Setting expectations can be challenging for companies undergoing a change from paternalism to performance. Human resources can support the effort by coaching managers and employees on goal-setting as well as training them in how to write goals that are specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and time-bound.

Feedback
Increase the amount of feedback given to employees at all levels. Put the emphasis on positive feedback--delivering at least twice the amount of positive feedback as corrective feedback will help employees feel good about giving their best effort.

Importantly, though, if performance is not up to par, corrective feedback is the key to raising standards. Paternalistic managers are reluctant to give feedback. Human resources can help by coaching managers on how to deliver useful feedback.

Rewards
Use your salary budget to reward your best performers. Make sure there is a significant difference between what you pay average performers and what you pay top performers. Don’t reward poor performance.

Again, human resources plays a key role in helping managers use the salary budget strategically. Use pay to support the culture change. Even if your salary budget is limited, use it to support performance, and change the bad habit of giving everyone “a little something.”

Keep in mind, however, that top management plays the most important role in achieving culture change. A positive “tone at the top” is critical to the success of any major change effort. Senior management must clearly and consistently communicate the message that high performance is expected; that employees will get feedback along the way about their performance; and that the best performers will be rewarded accordingly.

SOURCE: Patsy Svare, managing director, the Chatfield Group (which offers a SMART Goal-Setting Guide), Glenview, Illinois, March 6, 2005.
Chrm Message From: debora Total Posts: 79 Join Date: 14/04/2009  
Rank: Manager Post Date: 16/10/2019 12:24:33 Points: 350 Location: India

 

The shared assumptions of an organization’s culture are so well established that employees rely on them to make decisions and engage in behavior without consciously questioning them. Indeed, when outsiders critique those culturally congruent decisions and actions, employees often respond with disbelief that anyone would doubt such logical courses of action.

Many executives have been driven out of organizations because they tried to change the organizations’ culture. One casualty, as we mentioned earlier, was a Procter & Gamble CEO who lasted only two years because he tried to deculturize an intransigent “Procterized” workforce too quickly and forcefully. Carly Fiorina, the former CEO of Hewlett- Packard (HP), is another example. The California-based technology company’s legendary culture, known as “the HP Way,” revered innovation, employee well-being, and collegial teamwork.

 

Chrm Message From: debora Total Posts: 79 Join Date: 14/04/2009  
Rank: Manager Post Date: 16/10/2019 12:24:33 Points: 350 Location: India

 

The shared assumptions of an organization’s culture are so well established that employees rely on them to make decisions and engage in behavior without consciously questioning them. Indeed, when outsiders critique those culturally congruent decisions and actions, employees often respond with disbelief that anyone would doubt such logical courses of action.

Many executives have been driven out of organizations because they tried to change the organizations’ culture. One casualty, as we mentioned earlier, was a Procter & Gamble CEO who lasted only two years because he tried to deculturize an intransigent “Procterized” workforce too quickly and forcefully. Carly Fiorina, the former CEO of Hewlett- Packard (HP), is another example. The California-based technology company’s legendary culture, known as “the HP Way,” revered innovation, employee well-being, and collegial teamwork.

 

 
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