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Human Resources » Attrition and Retention


Chrm Message From: Jai_6969 Total Posts: 4 Join Date: 11/01/2012
Rank: Beginner Post Date: 11/01/2012 23:03:43 Points: 20 Location: India

Employee satisfaction is a broad term to use in case of attrition and retention. There are various aspects which contribute to attrition and retention. Broadly you can categorize them into “internal” and “external” factors. The external factors which contribute to attrition and retention are a) Market Trends, b) Social changes, c) Political scenario, d) Climatic/environmental issues, which basically trigger the comfort and mindset of employees. Also the e) family/social status changes and social responsibilities of individuals contribute to attrition and retention. The internal factors which contribute to the above aspects are; a) retention policy b) compensation, c) employee engagement, d) work environment, e) employee welfare, f) recognition and rewards, g) career path and development, g) learning curve, h) work culture, i) retirement/exit policy etc. You may attach the employee satisfaction with the internal factors mostly. Also you may also add that if attrition is zero then there is not much happening in the organization with regards to development and growth

Chrm Message From: debora Total Posts: 71 Join Date: 11/01/2012  
Rank: Manager Post Date: 24/09/2019 11:16:05 Points: 350 Location: India

 

An employee is an individual who was hired by an employer to do a specific job. The employee is hired by the employer after an application and interview process results in his or her selection as an employee. This selection occurs after the applicant is found by the employer to be the most qualified applicant to do the job.

This is always a risk that the employer takes because they need to employ people who can do the work required to perform a particular job. You can only learn just so much in an interview and selection process. The rest you learn after the employee starts the job.

The terms of an individual’s employment are specified by an offer letter, an employment contractor, or verbally. In a nonunion workplace, every employee negotiates on their own the terms of their employment. Many do not negotiate at all by choosing to accept the offer that the employer makes to them. Others ask for $5,000 more to see if they can start with a higher salary. 

In workplaces that are represented by a union, the collective bargaining agreement covers most aspects of an employee’s relationship with the workplace including compensation, benefits, hours of employment, sick time off, and vacation. The contract also protects the rights of the unionized employee and gives the employee options to grieve workplace treatment. The existence of the contract takes away the employee's individual right to negotiate his salary.

Most employees who work in service or product creating roles have a narrow range of potential salary offers since their jobs are defined with a salary range and benefits in mind. Employees who are senior leaders and managers are more likely to receive their job offer in an employment contract.

What Does an Employee Do?

An employee works part time, full-time or is temporary in a job assignment.

An employee barters his or her skills, knowledge, experience, and contribution in exchange for compensation from an employer. An employee is either exempt from overtime or not exempt from overtime; the rules about paying an employee are governed by the FLSA

An exempt employee is paid for accomplishing a full job in as many hours as necessary to accomplish it. Employers must pay the non-exempt employee for every hour worked as they are paid by the hour.

When an employee is classified as a non-exempt employee, the employer must set up a time tracking system to ensure that the employee is legally paid for every hour worked and for overtime for every hour worked past 40. in one week, and more than 8 hours in one day in some states (Alaska, California, and Nevada) or 12 hours in Colorado. Note that this may differ from state to state and in countries worldwide.

 

Chrm Message From: debora Total Posts: 71 Join Date: 11/01/2012  
Rank: Manager Post Date: 24/09/2019 11:16:05 Points: 350 Location: India

 

An employee is an individual who was hired by an employer to do a specific job. The employee is hired by the employer after an application and interview process results in his or her selection as an employee. This selection occurs after the applicant is found by the employer to be the most qualified applicant to do the job.

This is always a risk that the employer takes because they need to employ people who can do the work required to perform a particular job. You can only learn just so much in an interview and selection process. The rest you learn after the employee starts the job.

The terms of an individual’s employment are specified by an offer letter, an employment contractor, or verbally. In a nonunion workplace, every employee negotiates on their own the terms of their employment. Many do not negotiate at all by choosing to accept the offer that the employer makes to them. Others ask for $5,000 more to see if they can start with a higher salary. 

In workplaces that are represented by a union, the collective bargaining agreement covers most aspects of an employee’s relationship with the workplace including compensation, benefits, hours of employment, sick time off, and vacation. The contract also protects the rights of the unionized employee and gives the employee options to grieve workplace treatment. The existence of the contract takes away the employee's individual right to negotiate his salary.

Most employees who work in service or product creating roles have a narrow range of potential salary offers since their jobs are defined with a salary range and benefits in mind. Employees who are senior leaders and managers are more likely to receive their job offer in an employment contract.

What Does an Employee Do?

An employee works part time, full-time or is temporary in a job assignment.

An employee barters his or her skills, knowledge, experience, and contribution in exchange for compensation from an employer. An employee is either exempt from overtime or not exempt from overtime; the rules about paying an employee are governed by the FLSA

An exempt employee is paid for accomplishing a full job in as many hours as necessary to accomplish it. Employers must pay the non-exempt employee for every hour worked as they are paid by the hour.

When an employee is classified as a non-exempt employee, the employer must set up a time tracking system to ensure that the employee is legally paid for every hour worked and for overtime for every hour worked past 40. in one week, and more than 8 hours in one day in some states (Alaska, California, and Nevada) or 12 hours in Colorado. Note that this may differ from state to state and in countries worldwide.

 

 
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